Upper Respiratory Infections

Especially in this era of Covid-19 everyone on the planet has good reason to be  concerned about upper respiratory infections.

Upper Respiratory Infections and How to Avoid Them

The symptoms are obvious-scratchy throat, runny eyes, sneezing and coughing, and a slight fever.   

Maybe it’s just the start of a cold or maybe it’s something more.   It could be an upper respiratory infection, even Covid-19 or one of it’s dreaded variants.

Here’s how you can avoid one, and what you should do if you have one.

Recognize the Symptoms

Often, an upper respiratory infection will mimic the symptoms of a cold: the patient may run a slight fever, suffer from a scratchy or sore throat, and sneeze or cough often.

This can also be accompanied with feeling slightly achy or chilled, just as with a cold.Upper Respiratory Infections and How to Avoid Them

 Though they usually are not caused by a bacterial infection, a viral infection can be a likely culprit. 

A cold may certainly evolve into an upper respiratory infection.

Any time someone who suffers from emphysema or has had pneumonia begins to develop an upper respiratory infection, medical attention is necessary so the infection won’t worsen and turn into something far worse.

Asthma sufferers must also be careful around those with upper respiratory infections, as they are far more susceptible than the average person.

Avoidance and Treatment

Upper Respiratory Infections and How to Avoid Them

One of the best ways to avoid an upper respiratory infection is to stay out of crowds, especially in fall and winter, when the weather and other conditions-such as children returning to school-which may precipitate a more physically crowded environment.

Wash hands often with anti-bacterial soap or if soap and water are unavailable (such as when traveling) use an anti-bacterial hand sanitizer or hand-sanitizing lotion or gel.

Should a coughing or sneezing fit occur, cover the mouth and nose, and try to sneeze “into” the shoulder or elbow to avoid spraying with contaminated mucus or sputum.

Upper Respiratory Infections and How to Avoid Them

Nowadays, with the Covid pandemic in progress, we are all being encouraged to wear a facial mask around the nose and mouth, and try to avoid large groups, especially of children and the elderly, as these two age groups are far more susceptible to lung trouble and upper respiratory infections.

If the infection doesn’t begin to clear itself from the body within a few days, or if symptoms last longer than 14 days,(or if you know that you have been exposed to or tested positive with the Covid virus) seek medical attention.

Most respiratory infections are caused by an irritant in the mucus membranes of the nose or throat.

Sometimes the irritant can be viral but sometimes be caused by bacteria. If this is the case, a doctor may have to. prescribe anti-biotic medication before the infection evolves into emphysema or pneumonia.

Upper Respiratory Infections and How to Avoid Them.

Upper respiratory infections can happen to anyone at any time, but they are more likely to occur in the fall or winter months, and are more likely to cause difficulties for small children, the elderly, or anyone who may already suffer from respiratory difficulties.

The best way to avoid infection is to frequently wash hands, avoid crowds, and seek medical attention when appropriate.

Since having a strong immune system is vital in preventing and fighting upper respiratory infections, you may also wish to avail yourself of very inexpensive and helpful digital PDF work called “How To Bolster Your Immune System” which you can order here

At the moment they are offering this e-book at a 70% discount, which, depending on where you live,  should make the cost under $15  USD  or CAD, even if there are taxes.  

Any comments?

2 thoughts on “Upper Respiratory Infections”

  1. This article is highly relevant currently with the COVID-19 pandemic going around. I have been fortunate enough to have not caught the virus, but I am one who used to get sick all the time and come down with rather serious colds and flus. Since the COVID-19 pandemic started, however, I have not gotten sick a single time. It’s no coincidence that I haven’t been at school for the same time. You’re definitely right that one of the best ways to avoid upper respiratory infections is to stay out of crowds.

    1. Thanks for your sharing and your observations, Kevin.  Yes it seems that among other things that we have learned because of the Covid-19, is that we can avoid many other diseases by avoiding crowds and wearing face masks.

      In fact, I understand that there has even been far fewer cases of the normal winter flus this winter.

      Roland

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